The following studies have helped inform our approach to mentorship, and illuminate the connections between social-emotional factors and academic success.

 
 
College_graduate_students.jpg

A focused intervention for 1st-year college students: promoting hope, sense of coherence, and self-efficacy.

"Many students experience elevated psychological distress during their 1st year at college. Within the salutogenic paradigm (A. Antonovsky, 1987), sense of coherence (SOC), self-efficacy, and hope (in terms of hope theory; C. R. Snyder, 2002) are considered as protective factors in the demanding academic system..." 

exam.jpg
MozambiqueStudents_Page_800_1.jpg

Closing the Social-Class Achievement Gap: A Difference-Education Intervention Improves First-Generation Students’ Academic Performance and All Students’ College Transition

"College students who do not have parents with 4-year degrees (first-generation students) earn lower grades and encounter more obstacles to success than do students who have at least one parent with a 4-year degree (continuinggeneration students). In the study reported here, we tested a novel intervention designed to reduce this social-class achievement gap with a randomized controlled trial..."

A Brief Social-Belonging Intervention Improves Academic and Health Outcomes of Minority Students

"A brief intervention aimed at buttressing college freshmen’s sense of social belonging in school was tested in a randomized controlled trial (N = 92), and its academic and health-related consequences over 3 years are reported. The intervention aimed to lessen psychological perceptions of threat on campus by framing social adversity as common and transient..."

books-2158737_960_720.jpg

Do Psychosocial and Study Skill Factors Predict College Outcomes? A Meta-Analysis

"This study examines the relationship between psychosocial and study skill factors (PSFs) and college outcomes by meta-analyzing 109 studies. On the basis of educational persistence and motivational theory models, the PSFs were categorized into 9 broad constructs: achievement motivation, academic goals, institutional commitment, perceived social support, social involvement, academic self-efficacy, general self-concept, academic-related skills, and contextual influences..."